A graphic of a woman smoking a joint. Celebrating women in cannabis for Women's History Month.

Celebrating Women in the Cannabis Industry in Honor of Women’s History Month

Take a look at businesses within any sector of the cannabis industry and you’ll surely find some powerhouse women at the helm.  According to MJBiz Daily’s 2019 survey, 37% of cannabis industry executives were women, compared to the nation’s 21% average across all industries.  While this number is impressive, it’s also been fluctuating over preceding years.  We still have a long way to go for equal representation and ownership in the industry.

This gives us even more of a reason to shine a light on Women in Cannabis!  As National Women’s History Month comes to a close, Medically Correct would like to acknowledge the inspirational female leaders making an impact in Colorado and beyond.  While there are hundreds of influential ladies fully deserving of praise, we whittled it down to the following eight leading women who’ve been making a difference in the cannabis industry.  They represent various sectors such as retail, research, media, politics, events, and investing.

Wanda James

Wanda is the co-founder and CEO of Simply Pure Dispensary in Denver, CO, the first black-owned legal cannabis dispensary in the United States, alongside her husband.  She is a leading advocate in the cannabis industry whose political, professional, and financial work within cannabis reform has gained her prestigious coverage in numerous national and international media.  As the managing partner at the Cannabis Global Initiative, a marketing and consulting firm, she specializes in public relations, regulation and political outreach.  Previous to her career in cannabis, Wanda worked on the National Finance Committee for former President Obama, served as a lieutenant in the US Navy, and sat on the board of directors of several organizations.

Wanda James, founder of Simply Pure Cannabis Dispensary, the first black-owned dispensary in the United States. Wanda is considered one of the most influential Women In Cannabis.
A headshot of Sally Vander Veer, the co-owner and CEO of Medicine Man, one of Colorado's most successful cannabis dispensaries

Sally Vander Veer

Sally is the CEO and Co-owner of Medicine Man, a leading Colorado-based cannabis company she helped her two younger brothers launch back in 2013.  With degrees in business and chemistry, and a few careers previous to Medicine Man, her knowledge and expertise has been paramount to evolving their company to the forefront of the industry in Colorado.  She shared with the CO Women’s Chamber of Commerce that her favorite inspirational quote is “Hustle in silence and let your success make the noise,” which is a great reflection of the humility she weaves into her work ethic.  Fun fact – she was a contestant on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire back in 2008, taking home $16K!

Dr. Sue Sisley

Sue is an Arizona-based physician & the Site Principal Investigator at the Scottsdale Research Institute.  She leads WeCan Study, the only FDA approved cannabis trial for veterans with PTSD.  In recent years, she’s made headlines for her ground-breaking clinical trials, through which she is aiming to gather sound data on the efficacy of cannabis for PTSD.

Sue has an indestructible dedication pioneering cannabis research in the U.S.  Not only is she heading up a lawsuit against the DEA to federally reschedule cannabis, she also publicly called out the government regarding the poor quality of plant matter that federal law requires scientists to use in their limited, FDA approved cannabis studies (which makes a huge difference in the results that everyone is basing important personal and professional decisions upon).

Dr. Sue Sisley is a famed cannabis researcher studying the efficacy of cannabis as a PTSD treatment. She's recognized as one of the most influential Women In Cannabis.
A headshot of Jamie Perino, owner of Euflora

Jamie Perino

Jamie is the co-founder of Euflora, nick-named “the Apple store of weed.”  Her background in architecture and construction afforded her the ability to lock in an optimal location for her first store in downtown Denver and create an aesthetic concept that hadn’t yet been conceived in this space.  She was featured on MSBNC as a Pot Baron, telling the story of how she cashed in her 401K from a successful career in the building industry.  Time has certainly shown this was a great move for her to make!

Kendal Norris

Kendal is the founder of Mason Jar Event Group, based in Boulder, CO.  A Mason Jar is a southern cultural symbol of holidays, good times, and things that bond together new friends and old.  Such an appropriate symbol for this true community builder, who was featured on the Today Show for her curated events which include Colorado’s finest indulgences, top chefs and musicians, and picturesque venues.  Kendal crafts one-of-a-kind, upscale experiences that are thoughtfully paired with high-quality cannabis strains, touching upon all the senses and creating unique memories that last a lifetime.

A headshot of Kendal Norris, founder of Mason Jar Event Group which specializes in upscale cannabis events and parties.
A headshot of Khadijah Adams, a serial entrepreneur who specializes in cannabis and women empowerment through her Girl Get That Money program.

Khadijah Adams

Khadijah is an entrepreneur, investor, author, and motivational speaker…not to mention she’s also a single mother of four sons.  In early 2020, after resigning from her position as COO of CE Hutton, a minority-focused cannabis development firm, she founded the business empowerment and coaching movement, Girl Get That Money.  She has the mission to empower women in business by providing them with the resources and tools needed to help them become successful.  Her personal philosophy is, “Girls Compete but Women Empower!”

Beth Kotarba

Beth is the Chief Operating Officer of one of Colorado’s largest dispensary chains, Native Roots, whose company purpose is to Liberate Happiness.  Her entire career up until joining NR was consulting within a variety of industries.  Leveraging her extensive experience in helping businesses solve their challenges, she’s been able to successfully lead their vertically integrated operations including cultivation, harvest, product manufacturing and supply chain.  Belief in herself and confidence in her abilities has afforded her this role and as she shared with Authority Magazine, she has never used the fact that she is a woman as an excuse for challenges in her progression.

Beth Kotarba is the COO of Native Roots Dispensary, one of the most successful chain dispensaries in Colorado.
A headshot of Mary Jane Gibson, the previous editor of High Times Magazine and now co-host of the popular Weed + Grub podcast.

Mary Jane Gibson

“One of the most intriguing women in Cannabis”, says Forbes about Mary Jane in a 2019 article.  She is an actress, writer, and former lifestyle-entertainment and culture editor at High Times.  Traversing the world since 2007 to track the legalization of medical marijuana, adult-use cannabis, and CBD, you can imagine she has a lot of interesting things to say!  You can find her work in Rolling Stone, Leafly, and DOPE, and in her top-rated Weed + Grub podcast she co-hosts along with Mike Glazer.

We are certainly grateful for the vast contributions these women have made to the industry. While the status quo in the business world is still male dominant, with all the focused energy from these ladies and so many others, present and future, we are excited to see how the marijuana industry grows and evolves.   And one thing is for sure, we envision a future of equality!

Read more about all things cannabis at MedicallyCorrect.com.


incredibles THC-infused Fruit Chews, made by Medically Correct, are laid out and displayed on a white wood backdrop.

The Five Most Common Types of Edibles Found in Dispensaries

From ancient to modern times, edibles have been one of the classic ways to consume cannabis.  Edibles are food and drink products infused with cannabis flower or extracts containing THC, CBD, or both, and can be a delicious alternative to smoking and vaping.  Nearly any food that contains oil, dairy, sugar or flour can be turned into an edible; and the recent emergence of water-soluble extracts has allowed for even more edible options, such as beverages.  There’s really something for everyone, from unsweetened and sweetened baked goods to pills, and edible makers are continuously innovating their offerings.

Every producer of edibles has their own favorite recipes and processes, which means the flavors, textures, cannabinoid ratios, effects, and potencies can all differ.  Depending on the type of edible you choose and your personal metabolism, the time it takes for the THC to enter your bloodstream, and for you to feel the psychoactive effects, could be anywhere between 30-90 minutes (or longer).  However, more and more edible makers are beginning to offer fast-acting options for those who don’t want to wait very long to get elevated.  These products typically kick in between 15-25 minutes but can take longer.

incredibles Fruit Chews displayed against a wooden backdrop surrounded by fresh fruit

Most states have similar regulations regarding the amount of THC that can be infused into a single product for recreational use, which in Colorado, is 100 milligrams, often divided into ten 10mg servings or twenty 5mg servings.  Medical regulations typically allow a higher amount infused into each product.  Micro-dosing, commonly considered as taking a 2.5mg dose of THC, is rising in popularity as people are looking for a more functional high.  Some makers now offer their products divided into 2.5mg doses to cater to this market.

Below, we’ll cover the five most commons types of edibles found in dispensaries to help you with deciding what to try next time you head to the store.

Gummies

Gummies are the most popular edible you can find, consisting of cannabis oil (usually flavorless distillate), sugar, gelatin or pectin, coloring and flavoring. For those who have a vegan diet or want to stay away from gelatin, an increasing number of producers are now offering vegan gummies, so they’re becoming easier to find.

Gummies are often marketed as sativa, indica, or hybrid, and the resulting effects are energizing, calming, or somewhere in between, respectively. Typically, there are additional terpene or botanical ingredients to help steer these effects. One example of this is including myrcene and/or chamomile for a relaxing effect. You’ll also find both regular and quick-acting gummy options.

Chocolates

Cannabis chocolates are the next most popular (and delicious!) option. The robust flavor of cannabis oil is mostly masked by the rich flavor profiles of the chocolate it’s infused in. You’ll find all sorts of variations including dark, milk and white chocolate bars and truffles, with or without fillings such a peanut butter or caramel. Most bars are scored in ten 10mg squares, and truffles in 5mg or 10mg pieces, so you can dose yourself with precision. You’ll find mostly regular onset options, although quick-acting options are out there too.

If you love chocolate, you’ll have an easy time finding it in so many other edible products, so be wary about going to the store hungry!

incredibles Monkey Bar is an award-winning, cannabis-infused chocolate bar. Chocolates are one of the five most common types of edibles found in dispensaries.

Beverages

Due to the aforementioned introduction of water-soluble cannabinoids, you’ll now find a wide array of beverages, such as soda, energy drinks, teas sold in bottles or a box of tea bags, and infused waters both still and carbonated. These are mostly sold as single servings, such as a can or bottle containing 10mg of THC or 5mg THC and 5mg CBD. However, some drinks will have dosing caps to pour off a single dose if the entire bottle contains several servings. You’ll find both regular and quick-onset options.

Tinctures

Tinctures are cannabis-infused alcohol formulas presented in dropper-top bottles.  You’ll find many products labeled as tinctures that include MCT oil or glycerin in place of alcohol.  Tinctures enter the bloodstream sublingually via the sublingual artery when held for 15 seconds or longer under the tongue.  Some may be flavorful and sweet, while others may be virtually flavorless.  Flavorless tinctures are versatile since you can take them orally or add them to recipes, smoothies, etc.  High Times offers a great guide on navigating the world of tinctures.

A woman dripping incredible Wellness cannabis tincture into a tall glass of lemonade

Pills

As cannabis legalization continues to expand across the country, this category is rising in popularity. It’s a familiar delivery method that has very few additional ingredients and allows for very precise dosing. It is especially popular among the older generation, and those who cannot have sugar. Similar to other categories of edibles, there are both regular and fast-acting options available, as well as energizing, relaxing options and hybrid options.

Within all these types of edibles, you’ll find options with various ratios of CBD to THC available, indicated by 1:1, 2:1, 5:1, 20:1, etc.  As you experience the effects of different products, you’ll come to learn your preferences.  If you move to another state from Colorado, let’s say, your favorite brands may not be available due to the fact that cannabis is not legal nationally as of yet, so if you know your preferred ratio, you can use that information as a basis on choosing new products.  (Brands do love hearing from their customers, so let them know if you can’t find them!)

Know that not all edibles are psychoactive.  There’s a large market of full- and broad-spectrum CBD products in all the forms mentioned above which contain .03% THC or less.   There are also products containing just CBD isolate, meaning there are no traces of other cannabinoids present.

One last note, a great reminder pertaining to edibles – start with a low dose to first gauge how your body responds, and then wait patiently.  If you feel you’d like an additional amount, wait at least another hour or more so you don’t end up taking more than you’d like.

With all these options, what are you going to choose?  Find the type edibles you most want to try at your local dispensary by browsing our online menu.


A shot of two lab beakers full of cannabis distillate extracted by Clear Creek Extracts. This oil is used in cannabis vapes.

Everything Consumers Need to Know About Cannabis Vapes

Vaping is a relatively new delivery method for cannabis that has risen in popularity over the last several years. Vaping heats cannabis without igniting it, creating a vapor to disseminate cannabinoids and terpenes into your bloodstream through a vaporizing device that generates a fine mist.  This makes them different from traditional smoking devices like pipes and bongs, which deliver smoke into your lungs.

The vaping sector of the cannabis industry has been developing quicker than the scientific community has been evaluating the potential health risks of both formulations and devices.  As a result, it’s important to learn all you can so you can make the best decisions for yourself.  If you take one thing away from this guide, it should be to always choose products from the legal, regulated market.  Here’s everything consumers need to know about cannabis vapes.

Types of Vaping Devices

Vaping devices come in many forms, such as vape pens, e-cigarettes, dab pens, and desktop vapes.  Although some devices allow you to consume both concentrates and flower, most are designed to be used exclusively with one or the other.  Depending on your lifestyle, you may prefer one type of device over another.  For example, if you’re always on the run, you may prefer a vape pen that you can keep in your pocket or purse.  If you only consume at home, you may prefer a desktop device, such as the famous Volcano, to which a study the NIH published gave a stamp of approval.

A man holding up a Clear Creek Extracts DUO pod up against a graphic black and white background. Before consuming, it's important to review Everything Consumers Should Know About Cannabis Vapes.

Whichever you choose, it’s helpful to have one that includes a temperature control since the flower or concentrate you vape may need a higher or lower temperature in order to deliver the maximum amount of cannabinoids and/or terpenes available.

Electronic cigarettes, popularly called e-cigarettes, are similar to vape pens yet are typically used with formulas containing nicotine to simulate tobacco smoking.

Types of Concentrates

There is also a wide variety of cannabis extracts or concentrates.  For vape pens, distillate is most commonly used for its desirable potency, versatility, and typical lack of flavor or aroma.  This refined oil has been stripped of all materials and undesirable compounds except one specific cannabinoid, such as THC or CBD.  It can be used to dab, vaporize, and as an ingredient to make edibles, topicals and other cannabis products.  Terpenes can also be added to distillates to create various flavor profiles and to alter the effects.

There are also other concentrates, like full-spectrum extracts, shatter, budder, wax, rosin and CO2 oils, which all contain more robust cannabinoid profiles that evoke different experiences.

Cannabis concentrates are thick, and many vape cartridges used in vape pens and e-cigarettes need a less viscous substance to properly vaporize.  Thinners or cutting agents, such as PEGs (polyethylene glycols), glycerin, or MCT oils are used by many companies to liquefy these extracts.

Vaping vs. Smoking Cannabis

For those used to smoking cannabis, a common experience when vaping is a clearer high. However, people often debate whether vaping gets you higher than smoking, and if it’s better or worse for the body overall.

A shot of Clear Creek Extracts standard distillate vape cartridge and pen against a black backdrop

A study published by JAMA Open Network revealed higher quantities of THC in the bloodstream of the participants who had been vaping than those who had been smoking.  The vaping participants also had higher levels of cognitive impairment and adverse effects, such as vomiting, hallucinations, and paranoia.  It is believed this is mainly due to none of the material being lost to combustion, which means more THC enters the body.

When comparing the carcinogenic levels of cannabis smoke versus tobacco smoke, a study published by Dr. Robert Melamide revealed that cannabis smoke is not linked with lung or colorectal cancer, unlike tobacco smoke, yet is still potentially harmful.  The carcinogenic potential of smoked cannabis has been largely eliminated by the development of vaporizers.

Benefits and Risks of Vaping

Let’s start with the benefits. Combustion does not occur in the vaping process and is why vaporizing cannabis flower is considered a healthier option over smoking. What’s currently being debated in the scientific community is if vaporizing concentrates is a healthier option than smoking, which seems to be determined by the type of vape device and amount of concentrate used.

For those who need a high dose of cannabinoids to manage their condition, whether it be a disease or other, vaping has been an ideal solution as it offers a quick, easy and discreet way to consume cannabinoids. It’s also harder to smell cannabis vapor than smoke.
The smell of smoke can linger for days, whereas vapor disappears quickly.

Now, the risks. Currently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not evaluate these devices and formulas. As a result, products have made it to market with questionable quality and additives, some of which have been FDA approved for ingestion. It is known that when heated, some of these additives can break down into toxic compounds, such as formaldehyde, which are carcinogenic.

In 2019, a public health crisis arose with an increasing number of people showing up in the emergency room due to lung injuries.  As of February 2020, the Centers for Disease Control reported at least 68 deaths and more than 2,800 hospitalizations throughout the US due to vape pen lung injuries.  The disease, referred to as VAPI or EVALI, is strongly linked to THC vape cartridges (most of which were purchased from the illicit market) containing vitamin E acetate, an ingredient that can cause harm when inhaled.

PEG and glycerin have been shown to undergo decomposition when they touch the heating element of a vaporizer, leading to the formation of toxic carbonyl compounds which have adverse health effects on humans.  Stainless steel, ceramics, and glass are some high-quality materials companies can use in their devices to avoid creating these toxicities.

Vaping Safety

With the frequent increase in options of vaping devices and formulas, it’s paramount for consumers to understand the importance of consuming high-quality ingredients with high-quality vaping devices for the best and safest experience possible.

The illicit market, also known as the black market, typically offers radically cheaper devices filled with concentrate formulas that include harmful, hidden ingredients.  Using these devices and consuming these products are highly risky because they aren’t lab-tested and are completely unregulated, so you truly will not know what you’re putting in your body.  Exposing your lungs to cutting agents, residual chemicals, and artificial flavorings won’t be worth saving a few dollars in the long run.

A shot of two lab beakers full of cannabis distillate extracted by Clear Creek Extracts. This oil is used in cannabis vapes.

Choosing lab-tested products from the regulated market cannot be stated enough.  Ask the budtender at your local dispensary for more tips regarding cannabis vaping, and explore trustworthy products from manufacturers like Clear Creek Extracts.


incredibles cannabis-infused Fire Mints and Ice Mints are stylishly displayed on a white surface. Microdosing is preferred among new consumers; safety is the number one reason consistency matters when it comes to cannabis edibles.

The Top 4 Reasons Why Consistency Matters When It Comes To Cannabis Edibles

Before the regulated industry, cannabis consumers who desired the relaxing, body-encompassing high of edibles sought out cannabutter recipes and baked infused treats in their own kitchens.  However, because cannabis flower grows in a wide range of potencies and there was no method of testing homogeneity, the effects of the homemade pot brownie were inconsistent.  Now, licensed manufacturers test their edibles, allowing new users and those with low tolerances to experiment safely — but it’s more than just that.  Here are the top 4 reasons why consistency matters when it comes to cannabis edibles. 

1. Consistent Edibles Ensure A Safe Experience

Though obvious and mentioned above, consistent dosing ensures that the edible consumer is aware of how much THC they’ve ingested and what to expect before the effects kick in. Unlike smoking or vaping, which provide nearly immediately psychoactive effects, the onsite time of edibles is far longer. Traditionally-made edible marijuana products generally take 30 minutes to as long as 3 hours for noticeable changes in perception, and this delay is often the reason new users overindulge.

Three Quiq fast-acting cannabis chocolates are stacked in front of a blue background.

Just as you shouldn’t exceed the recommended dosage for pharmaceuticals, or eat three slices of your grandmother’s pound cake, overconsuming cannabis is not a good idea.

Avoid an uncomfortable experience and follow our mantra: start low, go slow.  If the wait time causes you to be hesitant about experimenting with edibles, know that new, fast-acting products are becoming increasingly available at dispensaries.  For example, Quiq, an innovative line made with rapid absorption technology, allows users to feel effects in just 5-15 minutes.

2. You Save Money When You Buy Edibles from Licensed Dispensaries

For anyone who’s shopped in a licensed dispensary, this may seem untrue. Flower always appears to be priced more affordably than edibles, right? Why not just buy an eighth and make your own infused goods at home? Well, consider this: when making a homemade edible, you’re unsure about the dosing and are significantly more likely to overconsume, thereby wasting your precious, and often expensive, cannabis flower.

In addition to that, if you’re cooking with cannabis at home, you’re likely creating cannabutter in a baked good. Brownies, rice cereal treats, and cookies are most common -- but consider shelf life. In a few days, those delicious confections will go stale; again increasing your likelihood of waste.

Infused chocolate bars and candy crafted by industry experts are made to last up to several months. Plus, the majority of adult consumers only need 5-10mg of THC to feel effects, meaning a 100mg edible package, the standard in most dispensaries, provides 10-20 uses. Not too bad for $15-20!

3. You Can Confidently Make Recommendations to Friends and Family

If you’re a medical cannabis consumer, which many of us are, it wouldn’t surprise us if you have a testimony about how the plant has changed your life for the better. Most of the team at Medically Correct can relate! Whether you’ve experienced a reduction in stress, pain, or otherwise, you’ve likely shared your success with those who you’re close to.

incredibles cannabis-infused Fire Mints and Ice Mints are stylishly displayed on a white surface. Microdosing is preferred among new consumers; safety is the number one reason consistency matters when it comes to cannabis edibles.

But as Leafly points out, many popular strains which share the same name are, in fact, quite different in terms of cannabinoid and terpene content, and that means effects can vary significantly.  They found that Durban Poison and Pineapple Express are among the least consistent.  You might love these strains, but maybe you’d shy away from recommending them to a friend, as they might have a completely different reaction.

Now, edibles are a different story.  To ensure quality control, edibles’ THC is added in the form of an extract, which can be precisely measured down to the milligram.  Not just that, but when creating an extract such as distillate, nearly all of the plant’s lipids, terpenes, and cannabinoids are stripped away except for THC.  This simplifies your body’s reaction and unlike individual’s responses to various, complex strains, overall, isolated THC produces a very consistent effect from person to person. 

4. Consistent Edibles Allow You To Enjoy Your Favorite Flavors, Time and Time Again

Just as you’d expect your favorite grocery store items to taste the same across all retailers, cannabis businesses are aiming to create that same trust and dependability for their edible products.  As more and more states legalize marijuana, the market has expanded to include more knowledgeable consumers that demand not only consistent THC dosing, but also reliable quality and flavor.

While any edible product you buy at a dispensary requires lab testing for THC content, deliciousness isn’t always a guarantee.  For the best experience, we recommend that you choose premium edibles created by established companies, as industry expertise often translates to better ingredients and more knowledgeable chefs. 

Nove cannabis-infused luxury chocolates pedestaled on a silver tray with other delicious pastries and coffees surrounding them. The blue tablecloth creates a stark contrast.

Where To Find Consistent Cannabis Edibles

Now that you understand the importance of consistency and the benefits of purchasing edibles from a licensed dispensary, are you curious where to shop?  In Colorado, you can order online and pick up from your local dispensary; and if you’re a fan of Medically Correct, discover where to find our brands and products by visiting our store locator.

What’s your favorite edible?  Do you have any tips for new consumers?  Comment your suggestions below, and share this post on social to continue the conversation!